MI man makes shocking discovery about 30-year-old doorstop

MI man makes shocking discovery about 30-year-old doorstop

After testing, she determined it was a meteorite, made of of 88.5% iron and 11.5% nickel.

David Mazurek says the rock came with a barn he bought in 1988 in Edmore, Mich.

According to the report, the man had been using the meteorite as a doorstop for the last 30 years. Weighing 22 pounds, it's the sixth-largest recorded find in MI - and potentially worth $100,000, according to CMU. The former owner told him it was a meteorite that landed on the property in the 1930s.

The man reportedly hasn't figured out exactly where the meteorite will end up, but a number of institutions are apparently considering purchasing it from him for display.

The farmer told him it was a meteorite, that it was part of the property and he could have it.

In January, the man chose to learn once and for all about the value of the doorstep.

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", Sibescu said.

The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., corroborated Sirbescu's analysis that the 22-pound "rock" is, indeed, a meteorite, and is apparently the sixth-largest of its type to be discovered in MI.

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Geology faculty member Monica Sirbescu shared that an unidentified man from Grand Rapids, Michigan, approached her to check out his 22.5-pound meteorite. For the past thirty years, he has used it as a doorstop and sent it off to school with his children for show-and-tell.

The man claimed he and his father heard the space rock crash into their property in the 1930s, and said it "made a heck of a noise when it hit".

The Smithsonian museum has valued the meteorite, which they named the Edford, at $100,000. It will be used as funding for students of earth and atmospheric sciences.

A mineral museum in ME also was considering buying it, and the owner herself - a collector - said she might purchase it.

The owner is considering selling the meteorite to a museum or collector, and has promised to give 10 percent of the sale to the university, the university said.

And geologist Mona Sirbescu said she "could tell right away that this was something special".

"Just think, what I was holding is a piece of the early solar system that literally fell into our hands", Sirbescu said of the meteorite.

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