CDC investigating 'brain eating amoeba' at surf resort in Waco

CDC investigating 'brain eating amoeba' at surf resort in Waco

A New Jersey man died after suffering from complications of a brain-eating parasite he may have contracted after visiting a Texas resort, his family said last week.

Stabile had used the park's wave pool while on vacation, according to the Waco Tribune-Herald.

Stabile returned to New Jersey and began suffering from a headache on September 16, according to the family's GoFundMe page.

An obituary for Stabile describes him as an "avid outdoorsman" who "loved snowboarding, surfing, and anything to do with friends and family".

Fabrizio Stabile, 29, visited the BSR Cable Park in Waco, Texas, where it's suspected he contracted the rare amoeba Naegleria fowleri, an infection so rare it's only been diagnosed 143 times in the United States since 1962.

Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers.

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Naegleria fowleri is a microscopic amoeba which is a single-celled living organism.

The infection, which can cause a deadly infection called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, usually occurs when contaminated water enters a person's nose, the CDC said.

Officials with the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention are testing the Waco surf resort's water for Naegleria fowleri, KBTX reported.

The surf resort has closed pending the test results from the CDC, he said.

The infection has a 97 percent fatality rate, according to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). BSR Cable Park owner Stuart E. Parsons Jr. says it will also continue to comply with requests related to the investigation of Fabrizio Stabile's death.

Parsons said his resort's wave pool is in compliance with the CDC's "guidelines and recommendations concerning Naegleria fowleri".

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