Papa John's to remove founder's image from ads

Papa John's to remove founder's image from ads

The University of Louisville has renamed Papa John's Cardinal Stadium "Cardinal Stadium", the latest in the fallout since Papa John's International Founder John Schnatter admitted on Wednesday that he used a racial slur in a business conference call in May. McConnell, an avid Louisville football fan, said "there's no place for racism in this country".

To say things have not been going well for Papa John's seems like an understatement.

Schnatter's decision to step down as chairman of Papa John's board comes after Netflix last month fired its top spokesman over use of the N-word.

Mr Schnatter, the company's former chairman, had used the racial slur in a conference call in May.

During the call, Schnatter had tried to downplay his National Football League remarks, saying "Colonel Sanders called blacks n*****s" as he complained that the KFC founder never faced public backlash.

Asked whether she was daring the company to sue over the name change, Bendapudi said, "It's not that type of situation at all".

Laundry Service cut ties with Papa John's shortly after.

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Schnatter used the offensive term while undergoing training on how to avoid future PR disasters with media agency Laundry Service, after he previous year controversially blamed NFL national anthem protests for his company's sagging pizza sales.

Keith Hollingsworth, a professor at Morehouse College's business department, said keeping Schnatter on marketing would be a signal to people that the company does not have a problem with his comments, or that it didn't think they were a big deal.

The Houston Astros didn't announce any direct plans to continue or suspend its relationship with Papa John's, but gave a similar statement, expressing that the team was "incredibly disappointed with the statements made by Papa John's founder John Schnatter", while also saying that they feel "confident that the local franchisees and their employees share the Astros' commitment to diversity and inclusiveness".

After Forbes broke the story, Schnatter's name was swiftly removed from Nachand Fieldhouse in Jeffersonville, Ind., and a spokesperson with Papa John's confirmed to Insider Louisville Friday morning that the company is in the process of pulling Schnatter's image from its marketing and advertising. Instead, further waded further into controversy after it was revealed that, during the call, he claimed "Colonel Sanders called blacks n--s" but didn't face the same backlash that he had.

In a statement, John said this: "News reports attributing the use of inappropriate and hurtful language to me during a media training session regarding race are true". The NFL announced it was ending a partnership with the company earlier this year. The company's shares, which had fallen almost 5 percent Wednesday, rebounded 11 percent Thursday after the company announced Schnatter's resignation as chairman.

Papa John's International Inc. began operations in 1984 and had more than 5,200 locations globally.

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