Mattis vows DREAMers serving in military will not be deported

Mattis vows DREAMers serving in military will not be deported

Defense Secretary James Mattis said immigrant members of the military who are now protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program will continue to be protected - even if the program expires without congressional action next month.

Exceptions could arise for individuals who commit a felony or has received a deportation order from a federal judge.

Secretary of Defense James Mattis on Thursday told reporters that members of the military now protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will not face deportation.

People who are on active duty or serve in the reserves won't be targets for deportation, he said, adding that veterans with honorable discharges would also be guaranteed safe harbor in the US, along with new recruits who are 'signed up and they're waiting to go into boot camp'.

But relatively few members of the military now benefit from DACA.

Snow and freezing rain on the way for southern Ontario
Freezing rain warnings are issued when rain failing in sub-zero temperature creates ice buildup and icy surfaces. Between two and five millimetres of freezing rain are expected.

House Speaker Paul Ryan said he'll bring a solution to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program to the House floor.

"I'm working right now with the secretary of Homeland Security", he said.

DACA service members are all people with a particular set of skills, such as being fluent in a key language, who came into the military through the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest program. So far, Congress has yet to agree on a solution for the roughly 690,000 people who are now DACA recipients.

In September, Trump by executive order rescinded the DACA program and set its expiration date for March 5.

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