Here's how you can see the Perseid Meteor Shower Saturday night

Here's how you can see the Perseid Meteor Shower Saturday night

Some meteor showers are slow, but we are moving into the Perseid stream so they are coming at us quite swiftly.

The Perseid meteor shower occurs every year as Earth passes through the trail of dust and debris left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle. It's also when the Earth will be the most within the stream of Swift-Tuttle.

The bright moonlight dampened the spirits of the around 200 stargazers who had gathered at the two vantage points of Jebel Shams and Jebel Akhdar on Saturday to witness the annual "Perseids Shower" that lights up the night sky. It last passed near Earth during its orbit around the sun in 1992, and the next time will be in 2126.

Scientists at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) say the Perseids typically will produce around 50 to 80 meteors per hour.

In August of 2018, the Perseid meteor shower will be pretty incredible, as the peak night for seeing it will coincide with a new moon. The best time to look up will be after midnight - aka early in the morning of August 13 - when the sky will be darkest.

UP madrasas told to celebrate Independence Day, event to be videograped
Earlier in the day, the UP MSP issued a circular in this regard and asked all madrasas affiliated to it to comply with its orders. The order was issued by registrar of UP Madrasa Shiksha Parishad, Rahul Gupta, who said there was nothing wrong with the order.

But experts have warned that with the moon at three-quarters full, it may make it harder this year to spot the meteors as they fly past. However, the meteors will streak across the sky in all directions, so it doesn't really matter.

The best night for viewing in Mid-Michigan will be Saturday. "It can take your eyes as long as 20 to 30 minutes to fully adapt to darkness after being in a normally lit room".

However, "The Perseids will be a little more hard to see due to the presence of the moon, which will be three-quarters full and will rise shortly before the shower hits its peak", Space.com quoted Cooke.

But you don't have to me a club member to watch the meteors at the park.

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